Is Being In Demand Hurting Your Job Search?

September 19, 2017
Phoebe Campise

When your skills are in high demand, it is easy to assume that finding a new job is going to be easy. You may be tempted to demand more, while putting less effort in to proving your candidacy for the job. If you are serious about your job search, this mistake could be the difference between landing – or losing – your dream job!

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the job growth rate for mid-level practitioners will increase 31% by 2024, dramatically beating out the average occupation growth of 7%. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners are not the only categories where demand is growing at such rapid rates! Most healthcare job occupations are projected to grow by at least 10% in the same time frame. Registered Nurses, Home Health Aides, Nursing Assistants and Physicians are also leaders in demand projections.

In-Demand Professionals: Use These Tips To Increase Your Chances At Landing Your Dream Job

Polish Up Your Resume

Updating your resume or CV can be a daunting task and some in-demand candidates may think they can put in a little less effort. However, a polished resume is the hiring manager’s first impression of the effort, enthusiasm and professionalism they can expect from you in the workplace. Even when you are in demand, you may still be competing with similar candidates who took the time to showcase their best assets. This is your chance to talk up your successes and give detailed examples of why you are a benefit to the team.

Build A Team That Works For You

Speaking of teams – let a recruiter join yours. Rather than shutting down offers of job opportunities when they are not a perfect fit, consider your long-term needs. Sure, recruiters may inundate your inbox. But instead of replying with “Not interested. Take me off your list,” take two extra minutes to explain what you are looking to do next, when and where. There you have it – now you have a professional networker on your side. The recruiter no longer has to guess, and you no longer have to decline job opportunities that don’t interest you.

Patience is a Virtue

Sometimes wish casting can go a little too far. “I will only go on a date with you if you pay for my food and buy me new shoes.” Rude, right? That is what human resource managers hear when you demand to talk salary requirements first. Recruiters and hiring managers want to be your advocate, but that can be a challenge for a candidate who appears to be interested more in themselves than serving clients and patients. Put your best foot forward in the interview process and it will pay off later. You will be in a far better position to negotiate once everyone loves you, sees the great work you do and really wants you on their team.

Take Time to Invest in Your Own Success

Many employers use personality assessments to determine candidates’ aptitude for success in a particular role. While it may take time and thoughtfulness to complete, assessments suit both your needs and the employer’s. These tests help get to the root of whether the role your are interviewing for is truly a long-term fit. Turnover hurts companies, but it also hurts you. Too many short-term stints and you could be labeled “job hopper,” the ultimate recruiting death sentence. Refuse to take the assessments? Well, that shows the hiring manager that you are not even committed to your own success. Ouch.

The Best Way To Land Your Ideal Job Is To Be Prepared And Professional

The job market is still a competitive, fast-moving matrix, even for the best candidates. This means, you must dedicate time and energy to stand out from the competition. Enjoy a more pleasant, productive job search by making sure you are always prepared!

Here Are Some Additional Tips To Help You Stay Ahead Of The Game

  • Set a quarterly reminder in your calendar to review your resume and add anything that has changed. This will save time and alleviate the burden of updating your CV when the time comes for you to apply for your dream job.
  • Prepare a quick two-sentence response for recruiters who contact you about roles that don’t interest you. Then, save it to your email templates! For example, “Thank you for considering me. This opportunity is not of interest to me, but please contact me about any oncology nurse practitioner positions in the Dallas area. I am also open to relocating to Seattle.”
  • Even if you are not interested in a new job, be careful not to burn bridges. Terse replies to recruiter inquiries only hurt you if you ever need future help in your job search. Plus, recruiters can be a great source of information. They typically have a great pulse market conditions, compensation ranges and new employers moving into your market.

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References:

  • https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm
  • https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physician-assistants.htm
  • https://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2016/a-look-at-healthcare-spending-employment-pay-benefits-and-prices/pdf/a-look-at-healthcare-spending-employment-pay-benefits-and-prices.pdf